Meet the Artists


 Ivy Napangardi Poulson

Skin Name: Napangardi

Pikilyi is a large and important waterhole and natural spring near Mount Doreen station. Pikilyi Jukurrpa (Vaughan Springs Dreaming) tells of the home of two rainbow serpents, ancestral heroes who lived together as man and wife. The woman ‘rainbow serpent’ was of the Napanangka skin group, the man was a Japangardi. This was a taboo relationship contrary to Warlpiri religious law. Women of the Napanangka and Napangardi subsection sat by the two serpents, picking lice off them. For this service, the two serpents allowed the women to take water from the springs at Pikilyi. This was because the serpents were the ‘kirda’, or ceremonial owners, for that country. The spirits of these two rainbow serpents are still at Pikilyi today. This Dreamings belongs to the women and men of the Japanangka/Napanangka and Japangardi/Napangardi skin group

Find out more about Ivy Napangardi Poulson from Warlukurlangu Artists' Aboriginal Corporation

 

Ursula Napangardi Hudson

Skin Name: Napangardi

 

Pikilyi is a large and important waterhole and natural spring near Mount Doreen station. Pikilyi Jukurrpa (Vaughan Springs Dreaming) tells of the home of two rainbow serpents, ancestral heroes who lived together as man and wife. The woman ‘rainbow serpent’ was of the Napanangka skin group, the man was a Japangardi. This was a taboo relationship contrary to Warlpiri religious law. Women of the Napanangka and Napangardi subsection sat by the two serpents, picking lice off them. For this service, the two serpents allowed the women to take water from the springs at Pikilyi. This was because the serpents were the ‘kirda’, or ceremonial owners, for that country. The spirits of these two rainbow serpents are still at Pikilyi today. This Dreamings belongs to the women and men of the Japanangka/Napanangka and Japangardi/Napangardi skin groups.

Find out more about Ursula Napangardi Hudson from Warlukurlangu Artists' Aboriginal Corporation

Murdie Nampijinpa Morris

Skin Name: Nampijinpa

Malikijarra Jukurrpa (Two Dogs Dreaming) relates to the land adjacent to the windmill at Warlarlarla (Rabbit Flat). This painting retells the Dreaming of two dog ancestors, Jampijinpa and Napangardi, who travelled along a creek bed north-east to Yarikurlangu. When they arrived, Jampijinpa and Napangardi made a burrow to rest in and started a big family of dogs. The ribcages of the Jampijinpa, Napangardi and their family can seen as features in the landscape in the Yarikurlangu area, and have been depicted in this work. Surrounding these prominent symbols, Nampijipa has depicted several waterholes in the Yarikurlangu district. This Dreaming belongs to the Jangala, Nangala, Jampijinpa and Nampijinpa moieties, who are shown travelling along the watercourse.

Find out more about Murdie Nampijinpa Morris from Warlukurlangu Artists' Aboriginal Corporation

 

Theo (Faye) Nangala Hudson

Skin Name: Nangala

This Dreaming belongs to Warlukurlangu country to the south-west of Yuendumu, for which Jampijinpa/Jangala men and Nampijinpa/Nangala women have custodial responsibility. An old man ‘lungkarda’ (centralian bluetongued lizard [Tiliqua multifasciata]), of the Jampijinpa skin group, lived on a hill with his two Jangala sons. The oldman would feign blindness and send the two boys hunting insearch of meat. While they were gone he would hunt and eat anything that he caught before they returned. One day the sons returned with a kangaroo that they had caught after much tracking. Unfortunately the kangaroo was sacred to the ‘lungkarda’, unbeknown to the boys. In his anger the old man decided to punish his sons and the next time they went out, he put his fire stick to the ground and sent a huge bush fire after them which chased them for many miles, at times propelling them through the air. Although the boys beat out the flames, ‘lungkarda's’ special magic kept the fire alive and it re-appeared out of his blue-tongued lizard hole. Exhausted the boys were finally overcome by the flames.
In contemporary Warlpiri pain􀆟ngs traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, particular sites and other elements. Usually sites that are depicted in paintings of this Jukurrpa include Warlukurlangu (a men's cave), Kirrkirrmanu (where the sacred kangaroo was killed), Wayililinypa (where the fire killed the two Jangala sons) and Marnimarnu (a water soakage) where the two Jangalas camped.
Find out more about Theo (Faye) Nangala Hudson from Warlukurlangu Artists' Aboriginal Corporation
ROSIE TASMAN
Skin Name: Napurrurla

 

Rosie Taman was born at Pawarla, north of the Granites area in the Tanami Desert. Her painting describes the country side of South East of Lajamanu called Jibiranba, located in the North Eastern side of the Tanami desert, where her father and grandfather were guardians of. It is where the Ngurlu Jukkurpa (Seed Dreaming) and Wampana (Speckled Hare Wallaby) meet. The grey patch is a small hill (Jibiranba). This area is rocky (small rocks) with a lot of spinifex. This site is very important to Warlpiri as here there are 2 Jukurrpa - Wampana (Speckled Hare Wallaby) and Ngurlu (seeds). Wampana Jukurrpa comes from the south west near Alice Springs and goes all the way to the ocean off Arhnem Land.


Rosie Napurrurla is kirda (owner or guardian) of this Jukurrpa along with the skin groups Nakamarra (Women), Jakamarra and Jupurrurla (Men). The colours chosen represent the colours found in the Tanami desert country. This art has been widely exibited in Australia and overseas. She was the finalist in the 2010 Telstra National Aboriginal & Torres Straits Islander Arts Awards.


Find out more about Rosie Tasman from Warnayaka Art and Cultural Aboriginal Corporation

 

 

PAULINE GALLAGHER
Skin Name: Napangardi

 

Pauline Gallagher was born in 1952 in Yuendumu in northern Australia. She paints her father's stories - Pikilyi Jukurrpa (Pikilyi Dreaming) and Mina Mina Jukurrpa (Mina Mina Dreaming), about her land, its features and animals. These have been passed down through the family for millennia.
The country associated with her painting is Mina Mina, a place far west of Yuendumu, significant to Napangardi and Napanangka women who are the custodian of the Jukurrpa that created the area. The Dreaming describes the journey of a group of women of all ages who travelled east gathering food, collected Ngalyipi, and performing ceremonies as they travelled.


In contemporary Waripiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites and the other elements. The primary motif used in paintings of the Jukurrpa are the Karangu which rose up out of the ground at Mina Mina, used by the women to collect bush tucker on their travels.


Find out more about Pauline Gallagher from Warlukurlangu Artists' Aboriginal Corporation

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